Step 1: Choose the Best Philosophy

Did you know that you hold a philosophy of the world?

You do. Most people don’t think of it as such, but your philosophy of the world is your belief in what ultimately exists in the universe and how the universe operates. Some people refer to this as a “worldview.”

Do angels exist? Do any gods exist? Does an impersonal force of nature exist? Does the God of the Bible exist?

Your point of view–your worldview–on all the questions above frames your philosophy of the world.

What we hope everyone will realize is that (1) they hold a philosophy of the world, and (2) that there is no reason to be limited by a philosophy of the world that limits thought on human origins.

When it comes to the question of the truth of human origins, your chosen philosophy will influence–even dictate–the the range of possible considerations open to you. For example, if your philosophy of the world is one that excludes a creator God–either by being an atheist or a naturalist–your range of possibilities for finding the truth of human origins is limited. We refer to this as a closed philosophy; it closes off certain lines of inquiry into nature.

However, if you choose to hold a philosophy of the world that includes the possible existence of a creative God, your possibilities for finding the truth of human origins opens up to an unlimited range of options. We refer to this as an open philosophy; it opens all lines of inquiry into nature.

In the search for the truth of human origins, is it better to adopt a philosophy of the world that limits the possible explanations? Or is it better to adopt a philosophy of the world that permits exploration of all explanations?

Is it better to be a free thinker with an open philosophy? Or a limited thinker with a closed philosophy?

If truth of our human origins is the goal, rather than defense of an ideology, there can be no dispute: Choosing to adopt and hold a philosophy of the world open to the possibility of a creative God provides for the most expansive range of explanatory options.

You will note that we use terms such as “adopt” and “choose” in describing philosophies of the world. We do this because one chooses one’s philosophy of life; it is not dictated by any necessity. Atheism is a chosen philosophy of the world adopted by those who believe God does not exist. Likewise, theism–including a belief in the God of the Bible–is a chosen philosophy of the world adopted by those who believe God does exist. The existence or non-existence of God cannot be proven in a scientific sense.

In a very real way, then, both atheists and theists hold their philosophies based on beliefs about the world; beliefs that are held by faith.

Our point in Step 1 is that any philosophy of the world can be adopted by anyone. And we are suggesting that if the truth of the origin of human beings is sought after, only one of the philosophies of the world opens up a consideration of all possibilities.

Would you like to examine the evidence in nature on earth and be free to consider all the logical inferences that can be drawn from the evidence on earth? Then choose a philosophy of the world that includes all explanatory options, including a worldview that is open to the possibility of a creative, supernatural deity, such as God.

Therefore, take the right first step on the journey of truth: Choose a philosophy of the world that provides for the broadest range of possible explanations for human origins. This means choosing an open philosophy of the world: Choose a worldview that allows for the possibility of natural explanations as well as supernatural explanations for human origins.

Being open to considering supernatural explanations, such as those involving a creative God, may seem strange to those who do not believe in God. But we are not asking you to believe in God yet. Just let the possibility of a supernatural God be a part of your philosophy of the world. And let the inquiry for truth unfold with all possible explanations on the table for consideration.

In the end you will be free to choose the explanation for human origins that makes sense to you. But by being a free thinker and open to all possibilities you maximize your chances of choosing the best explanation.

Choose. It’s as easy as that!